“To Risk”

This is plain reproduction of the great lines by William Arthur Ward. Coming from such an inspirational writer as him, the poem did well to get me me looking around myself n+1th time. Thanks to my dear friend Anand for sharing this with me. Here goes:

“To laugh is to risk appearing a fool,

To weep is to risk appearing sentimental.

To reach out to another is to risk involvement,

To expose feelings is to risk exposing your true self.

To place your ideas and dreams before a crowd is to risk their loss.

To love is to risk not being loved in return,

To live is to risk dying,

To hope is to risk despair,

To try is to risk failure.

But risks must be taken because the greatest hazard in life is to risk
nothing.

The person who risks nothing, does nothing, has nothing, is nothing.

He may avoid suffering and sorrow,

But he cannot learn, feel, change, grow or live.

Chained by his servitude he is a slave who has forfeited all freedom.

Only a person who risks is free.

The pessimist complains about the wind;

The optimist expects it to change;

And the realist adjusts the sails.”

>Stars and Stripes

>America! America!!
Whence came the love of this land?
Chances aplenty they say;
Prod ‘em long and they’d say
Chances aplenty but they take.
Greenbacks have turned us green
The trend can’t be turned by any hand.
If your folks are in America seen,
simply know if they are at the Bay
and ask if they’d ever come back to Motherland!

>For the Ball

>‘Twas a weekend the world couldn’t wait for;
‘twas a game none could miss for
‘twas against a side the most pined for;
History were the Albicelestes made of
The Deutschen, as steady as a rock and full of
determination were. The latter hammered one
after the other. Four to zero and they’d sure won.
Upsets marked 2010. The quarters said them all.
Game after game, the titans were but made to fall.
The finale next Sun is something we simply are waiting for.


-Metafore

>Limericks – Twisted to Convenience

>Limericks are basically five-line poems originally from Ireland of the 18th century. While experts maintained that a true limerick, as a folk form is always obscene, there have been varied versions of this amusing form of literature. Also, apart from violation of taboo, limericks haven’t really stuck to the standard five-line rule!

Following are a couple of my attempts at presenting a newer style of limericks. They come with an underlying theme, and not necessarily obscene, though folks can have them in good measure too!

-Met